CSX Transfers Staging from Locust Point Rail Yard

| May 3, 2018 | 2 Comments

At the end of April, CSX transferred all staging from the Locust Point Yard in South Baltimore to the Mount Clare Yard in Southwest Baltimore. Open since 1854, the Locust Point Yard was used for storing and switching train cars along I-95 between the South Baltimore and Riverside neighborhoods and Port Covington. The largest space at the Locust Point Yard is just south of Riverside Park.

Filled with train cars and engines just last week, the yard is now empty. CSX still uses its rail tracks through the South Baltimore Peninsula to serve its customers. These customers include Contanda Terminals (also known as Westway), Domino Sugar, PQ Corporation, The Baltimore Sun, and the Maryland Department of Transportation (MDOT) Port Administration Helen Delich Bentley Port of Baltimore.

Christopher Smith, director of corporate communications for CSX, told SouthBMore.com on Friday that the move was made to improve operational efficiency and to optimize the company’s assets. “There is no need to operate two rail yards when we can stage in one,” said Smith. He noted that no employees have been impacted and that the focus is providing “superior service” to CSX’s customers.

As far as the future in regards to the extra land CSX is no longer using at Locust Point Yard, Smith said a final determination has not been made and that the property is not currently for sale.

Much of Port Covington was a CSX rail yard up until the 1980s before parcels were sold for The Baltimore Sun’s Sun Park and the now former Port Covington Shopping Center. These parcels most recently were acquired by Sagamore Development Company. Prior to CSX, it was the home of the Western Maryland Railroad. CSX continues to operate additional Baltimore yards in Mount Clare, Curtis Bay, and Bayview.

The Maryland Transit Administration (MTA) MARC train still has a facility adjacent to Key Hwy. and just south of the Southside Marketplace. The train rides along tracks that pass through Riverside behind Riverside Park and that are situated adjacent to I-95.

The City of Baltimore is currently under contract with CSX to purchase a triangular-shaped piece of land that is adjacent to the Locust Point Yard and that sits beyond the outfield fences of Hap Hall Memorial Field softball field at Riverside Park. Baltimore City Recreation and Parks is planning an expansion of the athletic fields of Riverside Park.

This article has been updated after speaking with CSX. This article originally reported that Locust Point Yard had closed. It has not technically closed, but staging no longer takes place at this location. 

Locust Point Yard behind 1901 South Charles

Locust Point Yard behind 1901 Light St. and 2 East Wells 

Locust Point Yard behind Riverside Park

Approximate dimensions of the Riverside Park land expansion outlined in black (screenshot courtesy of Google Maps)

About the Author:

Creator of SouthBmore.com and resident of SoBo. Graduate of Towson University and owner of Incept Multimedia, a full service video production company. Diehard Ravens and O's fan, beach volleyball enthusiast, dog lover and "bar food" foodie. Email me at [email protected] and follow me on Twitter at @SoBoKevin.
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  • PatapskyCo

    That’s creepy.

  • Jeff

    The peninsula’s long-term development plan must include bridging the I-95/CSX gap between Port Covington and SoBo/Riverside. Until those of us north of the divide can safely and quickly get across by walking and bike, Port Covington will never be fully integrated into the surrouding areas and will never achieve its full potential socially or economically. I want to see the space taken up by the railways continue to diminish, and at least 3 pedestrian/bike crossings. My real pipedream would be to take the length of I-95 along the peninsula and put it underground, replacing it with a long parkway of trails, crossings, and trees. Our future must be the continued transition away from hard industry to the new economy and new American lifestyle, but doing it in a way that still embraces stylistically Baltimore’s maritime and industrial past.