New Neighborhood Signs Installed in Brooklyn

| December 6, 2019 | 0 Comments

Brooklyn’s two neighborhood signs on the northern and southern end of the neighborhood have been replaced. The project was spearheaded by the Greater Baybrook Alliance (GBA), a community development corporation that looks to revitalize Brooklyn, Brooklyn Park, and Curtis Bay, and neighborhood association Concerned Citizens for a Better Brooklyn (CCBB).

GBA received a $50,000 grant from the Maryland Department of Housing & Community Development for the signs and additional beautification projects in the area. Projects include a new sign for Old Brooklyn Park, funding for a playground at Marie G Farring Elementary/Middle School, a water fowl habitat for the Filbert Street Community Garden in Curtis Bay, a fence and meditation garden at Fair Havens AME Church in Curtis Bay, and improving a vacant lot on Inner Cir. in Curtis Bay into a community space with benches.

All the projects included a combination of sweat equity and working with contractors and design firms.

The new Brooklyn signs were installed in recent weeks in partnership with local vendor Graphics, Signs, and Wraps. The community worked together on the designs and colors.

The northern sign is located at a median at Potee St. and Frankfurt St. It is a brown wood sign that reads “Welcome to Brooklyn” and is visible to southbound travelers on Potee St. A previous sign succumbed to the weather a few years ago, and was replaced by a temporary sign that was installed and painted by neighborhood residents in time for Light City’s Neighborhood Lights in 2018.

The southern sign at Potee St. and Hanover St. is visible to northbound travelers on Ritchie Hwy. The former brick frame is still in place and a new white sign with gray Brooklyn letters was installed.

GBA started in 2016 and has received $5 million in federal, local, and private grants. Its current projects include a public safety initiative, improvements to Garrett Park in Brooklyn, a bike path connecting the BWI Trail in Linthicum to the Gwynns Falls Trail that ends in Cherry Hill, and pushing for economic development and affordable housing in its communities.

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Filed in: Brooklyn
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