New Video Shows Scenes of Baltimore Restaurants After Dining Shutdown

| January 4, 2021 | 0 Comments

South Baltimore resident Joel Anderson of Anderson Strategy and Canton resident Jimmy Richards of Bay Central Media produced a video to show the sights and scenes at Baltimore restaurants in the two days after the new dining ban went into effect on December 11th. Richards did the filming and editing for the video.

The video shows empty dining parklets designed by different restaurants, stacked tables and heat lamps, and images of closed restaurants. It also includes stats about the amount of restaurant workers out of work and the number of restaurants that have permanently closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“After Mayor Scott announced the comprehensive indoor/outdoor dining ban, our first reaction was just pure heartache for all the people and places that would be affected, especially after so many had invested so heavily in their outdoor dining operations—like adding awnings and tents and heaters,” said Anderson in an email to SouthBMore.com. “One that really stood out was Dylan’s in Hampden. They had literally just posted on Dec. 8 about their new outdoor heated bar and what they called “huddle huts.” The next day the city announced the ban.”

Anderson added, “Covid has been terrible for everybody, but restaurants specifically have just been devastated by it over and over again. And at the time the ban was announced, it wasn’t clear that there was any sort of organized or comprehensive help from the federal government on the way. It doesn’t take a lot of imagination or empathy to understand how defeated these business owners must feel.”

Anderson said they wanted to do something to help broadcast restaurant owners’ “collective pain” and “the simple message that they needed help.”

They thought the best way to do that was to head out and film the first weekend after the ban went into effect. “Seeing all the empty patios and sidewalks (and stacked tables and half-built tents) in rapid succession like that really drove home the magnitude of the damage the industry was sustaining,” said Anderson. “We didn’t count, but we probably captured close to 200 facades/spaces. We figured showcasing this vast emptiness in a video would have the same effect on our fellow citizens as it did on us.”

The video ends encouraging Baltimoreans to support restaurants by ordering carryout, purchasing gift cards, and insisting elected officials fund restaurant relief.

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About the Author:

Founder and Publisher of SouthBmore.com, longtime resident of South Baltimore, and a graduate of Towson University. Diehard Ravens and O's fan, beach volleyball enthusiast, dog lover, and "bar food" foodie. Email me at [email protected] and follow me on Twitter at @SoBoKevin.
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