Letters from the ‘Domino Sugars’ Sign Donated to Second Chance

| March 12, 2021 | 0 Comments

Domino Sugar, which is currently removing its iconic neon sign and replacing it with a LED version, will be donating the old letters and sign border to Second Chance. Baltimore Museum of Industry received the dot in “I” to display in its Decker Gallery.

From Domino Sugar’s Facebook page:

As the letters and border continue to come down from our 1951 Domino Sugars sign, we are pleased to announce we have found new homes for most of the letters and border. The dot on the “i” will be moving just a couple doors down the road to the Baltimore Museum of Industry, while most of the remaining letters and the border will find a home at the 250,000 sf retail space of Second Chance, Inc. This vital nonprofit equips Baltimore residents facing employment barriers with vocational skills like deconstruction, salvage and warehousing. We are happy these historic pieces will be more closely accessible to the public. We will be giving the “a” to Anderson Industrial Contracting, the company disassembling the sign. The iconic “D,” composed of several pieces, was most affected by rust and is not salvageable. We will be making souvenirs out of the “D” to share with the 500 employees of our refinery and hope to make some pieces available to the public for sale at the Baltimore Museum of Industry to help support their mission.

Second Chance said on Facebook:

It is a genuine honor for us to house much of this historic Baltimore icon for all to continue to enjoy at 1700 Ridgely Street across the harbor! 😍 THANKS Domino Sugar!! And we are so proud of you for replacing this treasured landmark with a near replica that is a zillion times more energy efficient! 👊👍

Baltimore Museum of Industry said on Facebook:

The BMI got a special delivery today from our friends over at @dominosugar_baltimore 📦 The dot over the “i” has found its new home at the museum! This small piece of the iconic Domino Sugars sign will be a BIG addition to our neon sign collection featured in our Decker Gallery!

Second Chance, which sells architectural salvage and antiques, is becoming a museum of old Baltimore signage as it is already home to the former neon sign from Parkville’s Bel Loc Diner, the old letters from Broadway Pier, the “I” from a PSINet sign that was once hanging at M&T Bank Stadium (formerly named PSINet Stadium), and the former neon sign from Rub BBQ in Riverside. It also has the former “Maryland” and “Terrapins” baseline from University of Maryland Basketball’s former Cole Field House arena.

The Bel Loc Diner sign has a permanent home at Second Chance as the Baltimore County Preservation society wanted to see it live on. Second Chance Founder & President Mark Foster said there’s been interest in the Cole Field House baselines, but no sales have taken place yet.

Foster said his organization is currently doing logistics planning to figure out how to safely get the Domino letters the 2.3 miles to its facility. Foster said most of the letters are about 20 ft. by 10 ft. and the move will likely take eight to ten trucks.

Foster said they will put each letter up for sale, but Second Chance is not yet sure where to start on pricing. One of the letters will likely be displayed in the showroom.

Referring to Domino Sugar, Foster said, “It was so nice of them to think of us and want to keep the letters in the neighborhood.”

Foster said it’s been a busy past year for Second Chance as they’ve been designated an essential business. He noted the pandemic has led many people to make home improvements, take on DIY projects, and clean out their basements to make donations.

“We’re thankful everyday because we’ve been fortunate, but we have compassion for those that haven’t,” said Foster.

Photos courtesy of Domino Sugar

SouthBMore.com photo 

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Founder and Publisher of SouthBmore.com, longtime resident of South Baltimore, and a graduate of Towson University. Diehard Ravens and O's fan, father of three, amateur pizza chef, skateboarder, and "bar food" foodie. Email me at [email protected] and follow me on Twitter at @SoBoKevin.
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